The sheer awesomeness of the Cereal Killers trading cards.

I’ve seen images of the Cereal Killers trading card over the years – a few here and there. I took them as any other internet image: I liked them and moved on. I had no idea they were trading cards you can buy online and collect! I decided to Google it last night and came across so many awesome images!

Joe Simko, founder of Wax Eye LLC, is the man behind the Cereal Killers brand. Joe is a New York based cartoonist who has illustrated for Garbage Pail kids, and it shows! Check these out, and if you like them, embrace your inner child and inner weirdo and go buy some trading cards!

The good news is, this isn’t all of them. There are many more. If you love the quirkiness of these gorey cards as much as I do, give it a Google. They’re for sale through several online marketplaces.

Hello, my name is Lindsey, and I’m a taphophile

taphophile

Noun(plural taphophiles)

  1. A person who is interested in cemeteries and gravestones

OriginAncient Greek τάφος (taphos, “burial”, “tomb”, “grave”) + English -phile

 

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Among my many strange interests – clown collecting, horror writing, tattoos – is a hobby people tend to find even weirder than the aforementioned. I love cemeteries. I’m not alone; that much is true. We taphophiles are out there, blending in and not talking much about where we prefer to spend our leisure time… because most folks just plain don’t get it. There are varied reasons why people visit cemeteries as a hobby. Some enjoy gravestone rubbing; some are into genealogy and tracing their family ancestry. Me, I just like to take pictures.

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There can be awkward moments when I would love to snap a shot of a headstone, but across the way is another visitor, bent over the plot of a loved one, mourning. When that happens, I never whip out my camera or phone. Most people don’t understand a person who appreciates graveyards. Collecting tombstone photos could be misconstrued as exploitation or disrespect of the dead. I assure you, it is quite the opposite.

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Certain stones speak to me, touch me in a way that I find myself researching the deceased’s history, thus bringing me closer to generations before mine. And graveyards are such a peaceful, quiet place where the squirrels and birds can safely frolic, so they tend to make me feel one with nature. Mostly importantly, though, this interest of mine helps me appreciate my own time here on Earth. The silence, the stillness, the broken memorials… it all makes you cherish your own life.

“Cemeteries are full of unfulfilled dreams… countless echoes of ‘could have’ and ‘should have’, countless books unwritten, countless songs unsung. Don’t choose to walk the well-worn path to regret. Live your life in such a way that when your body is laid to rest, it will be a well needed rest from a life well lived, a song well sung, a book well written, opportunities well explored, and a love well expressed.” ― Steve Maraboli

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“Wherever you go in the next catastrophé

Be it sickroom, or prison, or cemet’ry

Do not fear that your stay will be solit’ry

Countless souls share your fate, you’ll have company!” ― Roman Payne

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When you think of the word “stone”, you think of something solid, sturdy, hard to destroy… something that perhaps can weather with the passage of years, but that takes a great deal of time to crumble and fall. That is part of what strikes a chord so deep in my heart about graveyards. Each stone tells a story, as it was intended to do, and it will stand for a very long time to tell it.

“It is upon such stones that men attempt to permanently etch history so they will not exist in a vacuum; it is the final statement after a lifetime of scratching out divisions upon the ground, over ephemeral time itself, merely to give their short journeys meaning, to tell others I was here – do not forget me, do not let my brief blast dissolve into nothingness.” ― Rob Bignell

Along with taphophilia comes an enormous respect for the dead. Most of my time among them is spent solemnly and peacefully admiring the sights. But, I will admit that on occasion I get up to some shenanigans…

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I think I will wrap up this blog by sharing the cemetery videos I made 11 years ago. Cemeteries don’t change much, so they’re still as relevant today as ever. That’s the beauty of it! Enjoy. And if you are a fellow taphophile, feel free to comment or get in touch. Happy grave hunting!

The Weird World of Resale Shopping

Junkers, bargain hunters, collectors and antique lovers spend a good amount of time browsing resale items. Sometimes, they come across weird things for sale. There are even online groups dedicated to resale discoveries that are too weird not to share.

With the recent health concerns, those of us who love to resale shop, who find it therapeutic on some level, cannot shop at the moment. So, if you are one of those people and need your fix of weird resale treasures, this blog entry’s for you! Here’s a handful of strange items I’ve seen posted online:

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Shaunna’s husband found this clown at a garage sale. Shaunna is creeped out by it, and rightfully so. The clown currently resides in their garage.

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Oh, man! The husbands are at it again! Joyce, a member of the Facebook group Weird Secondhand Finds That Just Need To Be Shared (where I found these pics) says that when her husband spotted this rabbit ventriloquist dummy, he just had to have it. Wow. My Heart goes out to you, Joyce.

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No, you’re not seeing double. These figures have four eyes. The photo was originally posted by Kristina, who says she learned the story behind them after posting the pic. These figures were a bar novelty. They have a normal face on the other side, and when everyone was good and drunk and it was time to stumble home, the bartender would flip the figures to show their blurred, double-eyed faces.

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Resale shopper, Jenai, was so taken by this panting that she tracked down the artist: Kaye Smillie

 

As for myself, I have a controversial hobby. I collect clowns. I’m looking to sell a bunch of them, but then again, I don’t know who wants them… besides me. Lol. I own at least 120 clowns, and that’s not counting the carnival-themed items such as carousel horses and carnival glass. I also collect music boxes and crystal glass, but those don’t deserve a spot on Weird Wide Web. Not weird enough.

In closing, I will say this: As we all struggle through a decidedly bad start to 2020, being shut indoors and practicing our “social distancing”, let’s turn to our hobbies, passions, and collections for comfort. Stay safe, readers, and wash those hands. I’m not clowning around!

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March Weirdness

Welcome to my new blog. My name is Lindsey Goddard. I’m an avid reader, writer, and horror movie buff. Though my roots are in the horror genre, weirdness is all around us and isn’t always horrific. I like that.

So, what will I post here? What qualifies as weird enough for a blog geared toward everything weird?

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I don’t know. It’s March. Certainly a weird month, if you know where to find the weirdness. Remember how people used to think St. Patrick drove all the snakes out of Ireland? We could discuss that!

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Or… today is March 12th. Kerouac’s birthday. Jack Kerouac is credited as a pioneer of the Beat generation. His novel, On The Road, is chock-full of misadventures and strange substance use. We could talk about that.

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March is a great month to discuss ancient Rome. The Roman New Year was actually in March, as their ten month calendar ran from March to December. Also, March marks the month Julius Caesar was stabbed a ton of times in a conspiracy between like sixty of his own men! That’s intense history!

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We could switch topics to focus on weird cinema and discuss the recent release of A Quiet Place II in theaters. Does it really need a sequel? Is it worth the $20 popcorn and soda? Who knows? Some reviewers say it’s better than the first.

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Let’s see. What else is weird about March? Why, it’s Women’s History Month. We could discuss some of my favorite weird females in history. Like Maud Stevens Wagner, the first known female tattoo artist. Or Margaret Atwood, who wrote the dark and definitely weird, The Handmaid’s Tale.

Yes, we could discuss any of this. But we won’t. I just wanted to give you a feel for this blog.

I hereby extend an invitation to anyone out there who’s interested in being part of Weird Wide Web. Submit your ideas! Interact! Send me all the weirdness you’ve got hiding up those peculiar sleeves of yours! Contact info can be found on the main page at: www.weirdwideweb.org/Submit

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